• Today in Labor History
    Dec. 11, 2012: Michigan becomes the 24th state to adopt right-to-work legislation. The Republican-dominated state Senate introduced two measures—one covering private workers, the other covering public workers—by surprise five days earlier and immediately voted their passage; the Republican House approved them five days later(the fastest it legally could) and the Republican governor immediately signed both bills.
    ~ Union Communications Services


      Teamster News Headlines  
     
    Teamsters Joint Council 7 Endorses Gavin Newsom for Governor of California
    McKesson Investor Claims Board Failed Oversight Duty on Opioids
    OES Periodic Report
    UPS, Overwhelmed by Online Orders, Warns of Delivery Delays
    Wall Street Journal: Anheuser-Busch Orders 40 Tesla Semi Trucks
    Hoffa: It’s Time to Protect Pensions
    Local 754 Members Continue Strong Strike Line At Bay Valley Foods
    Hoffa to Abney: 70-Hour Week Not Acceptable
    Tulsa Red Cross Workers Vote Teamsters
    Local 264 Teamsters Ratify First Contract with Niagara Falls Coach Lines
     
         
    • Local and National News

      Hoffa to brief members on NAFTA 2.0 goals
      Nov. 29, 2017 | The Teamsters are taking a leading role in helping to craft a new North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that puts the people above the powerful. And tonight, Teamster General President Jim Hoffa will brief members about the union’s work. Hoffa will be joined by Rep. Brian Higgins (D-N.Y) during the NAFTA teleforum, which Teamsters can preregister for here. Those signing up ahead of time will receive a call when the event starts at 8 p.m. EST, 5 p.m. PST. More info

      Teamsters Union claims big win vs. largest opioid distributor
      Nov. 22, 2017 | In what is a big win for shareholder activism, and in particular for Teamsters Secretary-Treasurer Ken Hall, stockholders in the nation’s largest opioid distributor, McKesson, voted down the firm’s compensation policies and ordered the board to split the positions of chairman and CEO. The twin moves punished current boss John Hammergren for his failure to halt the company’s role in the opioid scourge. “For the first time ever, shareholders voted to hold a company accountable for its role in the opioid epidemic,” said Hall, a West Virginian whose state has been hit notably hard by the plague. Hall also said the vote “should serve as a warning” to the nation’s other big drug distributors that their shareholders, too, want to hold corporate conduct accountable… Press Associates

      Fight for $15 just scored big in Maryland. We have unions to thank
      Nov. 16, 2017 | A law establishing a $15-an-hour minimum wage in Maryland’s Montgomery County was signed into law Monday. It’s a meaningful victory for the Fight for $15, the union-inspired campaign to raise wages nationally. Montgomery is the most populous county in the state, with a larger population than the nearby cities of Washington, D.C., or Baltimore. It’s also a bellwether for Maryland politics, where organizing has begun already ahead of the 2018 statewide elections, including organizing aimed at improving Maryland’s wage laws…Working In These Times 

      Older news items can be viewed at 888 News.


      Dec. 6, 2016  | …The postelection uptick in support for journalism has not been limited to nonprofit media; the newspaper conglomerate Tronc Inc. (formerly Tribune Publishing) and The New York Times, among others, have reported thousands of new subscribers since the election. But for the growing number of nonprofit journalism organizations, the moment may provide the kind of opening they have needed to take on a much larger role for a field that continues to face significant financial challenges and sinking public trust… nytimes.com July 24, 2017 | The pursuit of the Chicago-Sun Times was thwarted by a Department of Justice decision to prevent the owner of the Chicago Tribune from also owning the city’s second-largest daily newspaper. So what’s next for Tronc, the company formerly known as Tribune Publishing that also ons the Los Angeles Times, the Baltimore Sun and the Orlando Sentinel? thestreet.com Feb. 1, 2017  | For a few says, the parent company of the Chicago Tribune [and Baltimore Sun] told us everything we need to know about its contempt for reporters and cynicism about journalism. Just after 3 p.m. last Friday, @troncCareers posted a tweet with a Dilbert cartoon mocking the idea of hiring reporters… robertfeder.com
      Dec. 6, 2016  | …The postelection uptick in support for journalism has not been limited to nonprofit media; the newspaper conglomerate Tronc Inc. (formerly Tribune Publishing) and The New York Times, among others, have reported thousands of new subscribers since the election. But for the growing number of nonprofit journalism organizations, the moment may provide the kind of opening they have needed to take on a much larger role for a field that continues to face significant financial challenges and sinking public trust… nytimes.com
      July 24, 2017 | The pursuit of the Chicago-Sun Times was thwarted by a Department of Justice decision to prevent the owner of the Chicago Tribune from also owning the city’s second-largest daily newspaper. So what’s next for Tronc, the company formerly known as Tribune Publishing that also ons the Los Angeles Times, the Baltimore Sun and the Orlando Sentinel? thestreet.com
      Feb. 1, 2017  | For a few says, the parent company of the Chicago Tribune [and Baltimore Sun] told us everything we need to know about its contempt for reporters and cynicism about journalism. Just after 3 p.m. last Friday, @troncCareers posted a tweet with a Dilbert cartoon mocking the idea of hiring reporters… robertfeder.com

      Elsewhere in The News
      Dec. 8, 2017 | FINANCES | Households can expect to save an average of $1,200 in 2019 thanks to the Senate's proposed overhaul, but the largest tax cuts will go to the highest income earners. Those are the findings of the Tax Policy Center's new analysis of the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act." In 2019, households across the board will save on taxes under the Senate's version of the bill. Those in the lowest quintile, with incomes below $25,000, would get an average tax cut of $40, while middle-income households earning between $50,000 and $87,000 would get an average tax cut of about $800, according to the Tax Policy Center. For the top 1 percent of households — those whose income exceeds $750,000 — taxes would fall by an average of $28,000, the Tax Policy Center found. But consumers may not benefit in the long haul… CNBC

      Dec. 5, 2017 | WORKERS’ RIGHTS | During the Barack Obama years, the National Labor Relations Board took a broad view of worker rights, expanding protections for employees who try to join a union or come together to improve their working conditions. Under the Trump administration, those rights are being reined in to help out employers. In a memo dated Friday, the NLRB’s new counsel, Peter B. Robb, orders board officials around the country to consult his office on cases the involve precedents set on worker rights during the last eight years. The move effectively strips away the discretion of regional officer to pursue cases against employers based upon Obama-era rulings and policies… Huffington Post

      Dec. 4, 2017 | ECONOMIC SECURITY | The Senate passed a long-awaited tax overhaul bill early Saturday morning. The bill, the biggest rewrite of the individual and corporate tax code in 30 years, would affect the pocketbooks of most Americans. It still has to be reconciled with a tax overhaul passed by the House last month before being sent to President Trump for his signature. How the bill will affect your pocketbook will depend on many factors. And the impact could change over time… Enter your annual household income and see how people like you could fair under the legislation. The Washington Post

      Dec. 4, 2017 | TAX REFORM | Just before 2 AM Saturday morning, Senate Republicans passed the most sweeping tax legislation in 30 years. The final version of the three-week-old bill was not released until four hours before the vote. There have been no hearings on the bill and none of the bipartisanship seen during the last major tax overhaul in 1986.  There were a smattering of last-minute changes tucked into the nearly 500-page bill, but the core of it is quite simple: a permanent tax cut for corporations combined with much smaller, and temporary, benefits for everyone else. Over the next decade, the $1.4 trillion tax cut would disproportionately reward the wealthiest Americans while piling on the national debt—which in turn will likely be used by Republicans as a justification for cutting Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid… Mother Jones

        • Nafta 2.0 update: Listen to the conference call here.
        • White House “chaos” may sink new NAFTA.
        • Labor voice: Congress, support working people.
        • Electric trucks: IBT monitoring potential threat to jobs.
        • Union pushed CEOs to fulfill working class tax promise.
        • Misclassification of Target’s port drivers an illegal scheme.
        • Unions seek to protect migrants from Trump deportation.
        • Trump paid over $1 million in labor settlement, documents reveal.
        • Cars made in North America aren’t necessarily built buy union workers.
        • UnionBase is “a first of its kind pro-union social networking platform”.
        • Children’s book ideas for rewarding holiday gifts.
        • Local Teamster’s charity brings smiles and hope to sick children this holiday. Donate...



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